Programming Success in Writing and Art

Theresa

I was in a Target store café where my wife had parked me so I wouldn’t get in her way while she shopped, and the pen-994464_640woman who waited on me said, “I see you come in here and write at one of our tables. Are you a writer?” I said I was and she said, “I thought so.” She then said, “I’ve got a book in me, but I just can’t find the time to write it.” She said, “Do you ever have that problem?” And I said, “No I don’t because writing is second nature to me, but it wasn’t always.” She said, “Oh, what do you think I should do?”

Her name is Theresa, and she is an exuberant woman who bristles with energy and has dark curious eyes that are always moving. There is a sweetness about her, a kind of goodwill, innocence, openness, and charm. Her body is thin and strong, her gestures lively. She is one of those brave people who are not afraid of saying, “I need help. Will you help me?” I like her.

I want Theresa to be a writer who’s confident and strong and not to doubt herself. I want that because in writing, as in any other field, the constant, never-tiring, never-ending desire to succeed and the confidence that you will—if not now, eventually–along with skill, is the most important indicator of future success. If you have confidence and faith in yourself, you’ll reach higher levels of achievement than other writers, painters, dancers, and actors of equal ability who lack them. Confidence precedes success.

I said to her. “Do you like sentences?” and she said she did, so I knew she had something.

Programmed Activities Force Out Un-Programmed Activities

I ran into a man in a Costco dining area where my wife had parked me who also had a book in him and asked me the laptop-820274_640same thing. I’ve run into writers and artists who tell me they wish they could get themselves to work more regularly. I’ve run into so many people who tell me things like that that I can almost give my remedy in my sleep, my saying, “The main goal of all creative people is to be productive—to produce works–and if they want to produce a continuous flow of works what they need to know is that programmed activities force out un-programmed activities.” That’s the principle they need to repeat to themselves and take to heart: “Programmed activities force out un-programmed activities.” Something extremely good happens to you when that insight lodges itself in your brain. Some writers and artists are 10, 15, 25 times more productive than others. The entire existence of some creative people is organized completely around their work, and their ability to produce it is staggering.

Two and A Half Million Artists

It appears to me the “I have a book I really should write but somehow don’t seem able to get myself to write it” syndrome is a widespread major writers’ problem. Or, “One day I swear I’ll become a painter.” Your aunt is dying to write a novel and your butcher wants to paint landscapes. Ask people on a crowded city bus how many would like to be a writer or painter and 30 % will thrust their hand in the air.

Paul Pulszartti 3 (4)

Painting by Paul Pulszartti

There are 2,500, 000 people in the U.S who consider themselves some sort of artist. And probably another 3,000,000 who’d like to be one. I’d bet that not many of those who would like to be are doing a single thing to make that happen. And many of those doing nothing statistically have to be more talented and potentially more successful than many writers who write for hours every day and painters who paint every day. There may be two or three Jackson Pollocks or Ernest Hemingways in Idaho or Maine who can’t get started.

It isn’t enough to say you’ll go running to improve your health. If you’re really serious you’ll intelligently plan and program your running. You’ll decide how often you’ll run, when you will, where you will, with whom you will, and how far you will. Then you’ll run according to your plan, and your health will improve.

If you’re serious about achieving greater artistic success, you’ll program that too. You’ll say, “I am a person bursting with unrealized potential,” and then you will intelligently develop an improvement plan and plan step 1, then step 2, and then 3, and so on—the steps being rungs of a creative ladder leading you to high skill, success, and satisfaction. Then you’ll stick to your plan and work hard as all real creative people do, and if everything goes according to the plan—and there’s no reason it shouldn’t–you’ll become more skilled, more successful, and more content.

Learning How To Excel and Plateauing

Another problem is learning how to excel. How many writers or artists would ever say, “My goal is to be mediocre” but yet are satisfied to be mediocre. Your climb to excellence has to be attended to. After looking for a long time into what runner-942109_640brings creative success I’ve come to the conclusion that to excel as a writer or artist or to excel in any occupation of any kind and have a long and fulfilling career, you must be pursuing intelligently a small number of certain types of goals. And each goal must be ambitious and each must be concrete because most artists and writers aim much too low and their goals are vague, and vague goals are useless.

Another major problem you see everywhere is plateauing—never getting better but staying at the same skill level and not having increasingly greater success, which you would think would not happen if you’re really learning. So possibly you’re not learning and don’t know any more about how to write or paint and how to motivate yourself and have self-confidence than you did five years ago. You’re working extremely hard, but you’re not progressing. You might be making the same mistakes over and over. You’ve stopped growing.

Something must be done—you need new inputs, new information, new insights, and new work habits. So you must become an athlete of the arts, a champion of writing or painting, and train yourself to run faster and jump higher.

The way to master a creator’s skills is to learn how to do them supremely well and practice them ten times, a hundred times, a thousand, getting constructive feedback along the way, making corrections, and experiencing a series of successes as your performance improves. Most often the reason a writer or artist is not yet accomplished is not because she’s unintelligent or not talented but because she isn’t knowledgeable enough yet of her craft.

Not Screwing Around Anymore

Theresa and the Costco man tell me they want very badly to be as excellent writers as they can be, and I believe them. Chances are you and I have never met and haven’t had a chance to talk, and it would be nice if someday we do. But I’m assuming that you’ve reached a state of being when you can say, “I want very much to be the most highly skilled, successful, and satisfied writer or artist I can be. That’s what I think about and that’s why I’m reading this blog. I’m not screwing around anymore.”

Theresa’s Programmed Activity

But many writers and artists—even those who claim that work is tremendously important to them–are lucky if they slice out an hour a day, or thirty minutes, one-forty-eighth of a day, to work on their craft. Creating isn’t all you do. You goal-976853_640have other important roles and responsibilities you must find ways of incorporating into your work schedule as depicted in this comment from writer Lois Duncan:

“Now I keep a typewriter with a sheet of paper in it on the end of the kitchen table. When I have a five-minute lull and the children are playing quietly I sit down and knock out a paragraph. I have learned that I can write, if necessary, with a TV blaring on one side of me and a child banging a toy piano on the other. I have even typed out a story with a colicky baby draped across my lap. It is not ideal—but it is possible.”

Expert writers and artists almost always structure their work time and environment carefully. I told Theresa that she had to commit to me that she would write thirty minutes every day without exception except for real emergencies—could she do that? Yes, she said, she could. I asked her the time she would write: “First thing before I go to work. I’ll get up a half hour early, shower, get dressed, and then I’ll sit down and write for a half hour.”

I thought of author Hope Dahle Jordan who said, “My personal, elementary rule sounds ludicrous even to me. Nevertheless, I am deadly serious when I insist it is the only one I conscientiously adhere to: I don’t dress for the day until two pages (500 words) are written, and acceptable to me. That is the only way I get a book finished. For as long as I stay in my blue bathrobe I stay at my typewriter.” Harry Crews said, “ I get up in the morning, that’s one of the hard parts, drag myself over to the old typewriter and sit down—that’s even harder—and then tell the Lord, ‘I ain’t greedy Lord, give me the next 500 words.’”

I told her that like artists, writers must guard again a two-pronged problem: avoiding work and quitting too soon.

I told Theresa not to be jealous of writers who have the luxury of being able to write as often as they want and as many minutes or hours as they want. I told her that doesn’t mean they’re the most productive writers or artists or that they’re writing-828911_640productive at all. It just means that the amount of time most writers and artists would give an arm and a leg to have is available to them. But I assured her that she would find that a focused half-hour’s work with a concrete goal clearly in mind is the equivalent of three unfocused hours.

I told Theresa that later on we can talk about how in addition to spending time writing she can increase her writing skills in other ways. In the future we will set goals to increase her abilities. And I told her one day we will talk about the Inner Skills of writers and artists, such as the need for courage, and that she should be completely indifferent to everything but the quality of her work.

I told her, “If you want to be read widely, read widely. Reading good writing with the intention of learning specific lessons from it is the best way to learn to write well. Good artists learn by going to museums, taking out a sketch pad, and copying masterpieces. To be able to say, ‘I learned that from so-and-so and borrowed that from what’s-her-name.’” Theresa should also learn about the way of life of a writer, which is different from a social worker’s way of life or a businessman’s or even a painter’s.

Then I said I wanted Theresa to jot down in a log a few quick sentences about each day’s writing: how it went, what journal-155431_640problems she had and how she solved them, and most important, what she’s learning about writing and about herself. What comes easily for her; what is hard? Writers and artists who set ambitious goals and keep records of their performance are considerably more effective than writers and artists who don’t.

I asked Theresa to have a very specific goal in mind whenever she sits down to work: what is she aiming to accomplish in the next half hour, the way a painter says, “By the time I finish today I will have finished the upper right corner of the canvas.” I told her that now that she’ll be getting up a half hour early she should go to bed a half hour earlier because when you’re tired you’re not ambitious and your writing or art goals won’t be ambitious either.

Talent and Many Truths to Tell

I feel that Theresa has a talent for writing because it has been said by those who study the development of high expertise that if you have an intense interest in a creative field, that is almost always a sure sign that you have a talent for it. I have faith in Theresa. When I think about her, I think about writer Louise Nevelson’s theory that “when we come on this earth, many of us are ready-made. Some of us—most of us—have genes that are ready for certain performances. Nature gives you these gifts…There’s nobody that’s common. I think that in every human being there is greatness.”

I tell her not be afraid to be bold and that truth is everything in art, and that when readers open her books one day they will ask themselves, “Am I going to find the truth in here?”

I don’t think she will become a writer who doesn’t write or who will give up before she succeeds. I have a sense that she may have the makings of a REAL writer and that writing may become an essential part of her identity. I hope she soon sees that a writer’s life is wonderful and worth sacrificing for: “I did not choose this vocation, and if I had any say in the matter, I would not have chosen it…Yet for this vocation I was and am willing to live and die, and I consider very few other things of the slightest importance” (Katherine Anne Porter). I tell her that nothing can compare with, nothing can replace the joy during the act of creating. American poet Robert Frost said that once a man has known the pleasure of making a metaphor he is unfit for ordinary work.

sunrise-580379_640At the crack of dawn almost every day Theresa is writing. Writing is becoming second nature to her. Her book is taking shape day by day. My wife is shopping over there and I’m at a table in Theresa’s store now and I’m thinking that if I’m right about Theresa soon the creator’s hunger to produce will take over and she will start writing during her breaks and lunch hours too.

 

© 2015 David J. Rogers

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10 Comments

Filed under Artists, Becoming an Artist, Creativity Self-Improvement, Developing Talent, Human Potential and Achievement, Goals and Purposes, High Achievement, Inner Skills, Motivation, Personal Stories, Programmed Activity, Self-Confidence, Self-Direction, Success, The Writer's Path, Work Production, Writers

10 responses to “Programming Success in Writing and Art

  1. Good morning David, What a treat to find your post on this Saturday morning and once again your writing gives me, and I am sure many others, so much. I agree with everything you say here. Some of the most brilliantly creative people I have ever met, alas have not been able to programme their days. The way I like to express that sentiment is that ‘discipline equals freedom’. It’s so easy to find reasons why we can’t do something….and so the key is to switch that thinking around to why – we can do something, and starting with a half hour plan a day is an excellent plan.
    When my daughter was born in March 1975 – and at that time my son was already nine years old, I organised my days so that I could continue to paint. When Christie was one year old, I had my first solo exhibition in the States….this meant that my creative life had to be integrated with all the other things in my life. Christie grew up in the studio and for that first year was strapped to me in a papoose while I painted. All these years later, both my children agree that although life was different from many of their friends, it was a rich life and one that has spurred them onto follow their creative dreams.
    And yes, always growing and embracing the new is very important.
    Thank you once again for a wonderful post. I do hope you have a lovely weekend, and I will look forward to the day when I can read some of Theresa’s work. Janet.:)

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    • davidjrogersftw

      Janet, I like very much your “Discipline equals freedom.” It reminds me so much of what the composer Stravinsky said: That all the strict rules of composing gave him too a tremendous feeling of freedom. I’m happy that you think my half-hour rule is a good one, and I so enjoy the image of Christie as a baby being strapped to you. What an exciting, creative life your children must have had with you. What are their pursuits now? I notice that your followers hug you a lot, so here is my hug too. You seem like such a endearing person that you inspire hugs universally.

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      • Good morning David, my son Jarrod is a musician/song writer and Christie writes and is a natural watercolorist. They are both wonderful human beings. I think I might write a blog on the subject of ‘discipline equals freedom’. Years ago, I wrote to my parents and thanked them for the gift of self discipline. It was when I began to recognise that so many very creative people, some naturally brilliant, were unable to string two days together. Distractions/excuses always seemed to get in the way. I had a massive turning point at the age of 40 when I realised that I needed a ‘plan’ and slowly but surely I implemented one which has stayed with me since – it was when I recognised the importance of having rhythms in my daily life. I so appreciate your blogs because they inspire and open up my own chain of thought. Thank you and sending hugs in your direction. Janet:)

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        • davidjrogersftw

          Janet, I’m so happy to hear that your children are creative too because I know what joy that can bring into a person’s like. I’m sure you’re very proud of them. I have four children. Three of them live close to me in the Chicago area and one lives in the Denver area. They’re all successful and all very hard workers, and as you say, disciplined. It’s pretty widely known nowadays that a disposition to hard working is genetic, and I’ll bet you that self-discipline has a genetic component as well as being learned. So it is not surprising that your parents valued it. I look forward to reading your blog on “discipline and freedom.” I’m so pleased that you find my writing of value and that it resonates with you. I started writing a blog because my son, seeing how much writing I was producing, said I should send it out on a blog and get feedback. And that, it turns out, is one of my great joys–establishing relationships with talented and warm and inviting people like you. Hugs back.

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        • Good morning David, and thank you. Yes, one of the great benefits of technology is just this, being able to connect with like minded people like yourself, who we might otherwise have never known…..I keep your book ‘Fighting To Win’ at hand – it’s another one of those gifts of life. Enjoy the day and week ahead. Janet.:)

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        • davidjrogersftw

          And my very best to you, Janet. So happy you like my book. I hope your work goes well this week.

          Liked by 1 person

  2. This is a very powerful post David, and as a painter I certainly following some of these steps, but like Theresa and Costco man I now think I would like to write too and you have planted some seeds today …

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    • davidjrogersftw

      Michelle, I’m always telling you what an excellent writer you are. It’s amazing to have two talents as you do. Thank you for your compliment. I’m glad I inspire you in some way. What kind of writing would you be doing? Whatever it is, I’m sure that it will be striking as your roses always are. I remember the joy I felt when I read Van Gogh’s letters and discovered how beautifully he could write. I’ve noticed that no one can write a description of nature as skillfully and notice such detail as a painter can.

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      • Thank you David, the symbolism and mystery of roses is as intoxicating to me as their fragrance and form, so I am feeling drawn to write a fable or a mystery capturing the essence of roses.

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        • davidjrogersftw

          Michelle, as I was reading your words Shakespeare’s The Tempest quickly came to mind. How wonderful your project sounds–roses–a fantasy-a mystery–poetry–dreams–just great.

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