Writers with No Desire to Publish

The senior editor of a literary journal asked a writer friend of mine to submit a piece for a future issue, but my friend who thanked the editor for the compliment has no interest in submitting anything to that magazine or any other.  I’ll call her Kathy because that’s the name she wishes she brown silhouette against gold background of a woman working at a computerhad, but doesn’t. It is a highly-regarded journal and would enhance any serious writer’s reputation to appear in it. That journal had published other pieces of Kathy’s in the past during her particularly prolific period when work poured out of her and was in demand by editors and readers. Some of her books were being published at the time, and many of her articles appearing in magazines were achieving record readership scores.

Kathy is far from alone now being a writer who works as hard as ever at the writer’s craft to perfect her work, and has high standards–revising, refining, embellishing, cutting, and improving endlessly–but does not care to be published by book or magazine publishers. People like Kathy enjoy writing for its own sake and its own sake alone. Publication that was once important to her is not important to her now. People ask her, “Don’t you get a kick out of seeing your name in print?” and she answers, “Ive seen it in print many times so it is not as big a thrill.”

colorful pile of open magazine pagesI am talking about the difference between writers whose overriding goal is to see their work in print–a Publication Focus–contrasted with writers whose overriding goal stops short of publication in which they are not interested. They are concerned solely with generating what is in their judgment the highest possible quality text–a Production Focus.  The latter are more than contented to produce works they are proud of without seeing them published.

Having their work published seems an automatic motivation for writers that follows sequentially from writing the work, and is generally expected of writers–you are a writer and you write a story, for example, and then you are expected to submit it to a magazine (or a novel to a publishing house) where a committee of editors and managers evaluate it in comparison with other submissions and decide if it is suitable for them to publish. The submitting writers are competing for a prize and the prize they are competing for is seeing their name and their work printed, perhaps for pay, but even if not for pay, for the delightful satisfaction of well, having a work published which they can tell friends and family about, which for most writers is the whole point, the end goal for which they are prepared to work very hard.

What could writers who are not motivated to publish possibly be thinking, and what does motivate them to go on writing with no intention or hope of seeing the finished product in print where it would be read by  hundreds, or thousands of others–or more–many of them fans of good writing?

Research

Production Writers who have no desire to publish don’t have to wait for money or praise or any external reward to be fully satisfied. All that fantasy picture of woman standing on an open book flying a kitematters to them is that the works they produce be the best they have the skills to produce. They believe that because they are not interested in publishing but in producing the highest quality work they can, they are more creative and do better work than they would were they competing with others to see their work in print, and there are grounds for that belief.

Harvard psychologist Teresa M. Amabile has spent her entire career trying to understand what motivates people to be creative and what are dis-incentives. She has staked her reputation on proving that creativity increases when you are what she calls intrinsically motivated and engage in the creative activity for the sheer pleasure it offers (as Production Writers do). If you write, paint, sculpt, dance, etc, to earn rewards other than the enjoyment, satisfaction, and challenge of performing the activity as well as you are able (as Publication Writers do), you are extrinsically motivated and  become less creative. The work that results is not as finished-beautiful-aesthetically pleasing-masterful as it might have been.

Amabile tested subjects ranging from young children to college women, giving some of them rewards for doing the work. What they had pile of magazines and booksproduced was then graded by professionals–seasoned painters grading the paintings, experienced writers the writing, etc. The results were significant in that no matter what the reward was or when it was given, if the subjects thought they were working for  external rewards, even a little trinket, and not for fun and pleasure, they became less creativeBut when they were light-hearted and fooling around and no external reward was involved, they were more creative and their work was better.

In one experiment Amabile divided writers into two groups. She had one group fill out a questionnaire about the joys of writing for its own sake such as being able to experiment with words. The other group filled out a different questionnaire about the external benefits of writing like being on a bestseller list. Writers in both groups then wrote short, haiku-like poems. Then a panel of judges—poets–rated the poems. The writers who had been thinking about rewards like bestsellers wrote inferior poems. Extrapolated, that suggests that it may be detrimental to the quality of your next novel to have making The New York Times list on your mind.

I had experiences that confirmed Amabile’s research in my writing life. When I was writing one book, my mind was solely on communicating in man sitting on the edge of a cup of coffee, writing on a laptop computera clear, informative, and entertaining way concepts that were unfamiliar to western thinking. It was a challenge because the concept of the book was totally new and original. Every day’s work  of many hours was fulfilling, I didn’t spend a second thinking about how my book would do in the stores, only about the book’s clarity and how useful I could make it and how inviting it would be for readers. It was a highly successful and profitable book and my ambitions for the next book I began were high. But I found my thoughts losing focus. They often wandered away from the book’s content and style and how to satisfy the reader to where I would build the new house the new book’s royalties would bring me and the kind of cars I would buy. Both books received many accolades and made best seller lists. But whereas I wouldn’t change a single word of the first book, I live with the knowledge that the second book could have been better.

Publication Writers in Contrast with Production Writers

Publication Writers often experience stress and worry about the chances of the work being published. But in contrast the Production Writer feels no pressure, no stress, and is relaxed. That experience can make Production Writers feel freer and bolder and unafraid of taking chances they might not otherwise take, but which might improve the work. That freer confident mood can lead to leaps in their performance. William Faulkner is a good example.

When Faulkner realized that his complex rhetorical style and subject matter weren’t those of a commercially-popular author (would not lead to extrinsic rewards such as high sales) he began a period of sustained creative energy. He started to become great. He decided to write for himself: brown shut door in the middle of black wall“One day I seemed to shut a door between me and all publishers. I said to myself, ‘Now I can write.” He started working on The Sound and the Fury, “thinking of books, publication, only in the sense in saying to myself, I wont (sic) have to worry about publishers liking or not liking this at all.”

A disincentive Publication Writers must face is the inevitability that their work is going to be evaluated by editors and others. They are competing for the good opinion and a favorable decision of people who have power who will be passing judgment on the quality of the work, and indirectly, also the quality of the writer. That is why rejections can be so hurtful and discouraging, and taken so personally: “In rejecting what I have worked so hard on and put so much effort into they are telling me I am inadequate.” Thousands of writers make the decision to quit silhouette of dejected man sitting with head on his hand with a background of words such as worthless, unwanted, hopeless, etc.writing every day.  Most of them quit because of the heavy, depressing weight of too many failures and too few–if any–successes and the toll of failures on one’s confidence and sense of competence and self-esteem. Extraordinary self-confidence is necessary to persist in the face of failures and setbacks.

The knowledge that the submission will be evaluated negatively affects the writer and tends to produce works that are more conventional. Some of them are written specifically to suit the publication as if to order. Magazines and publishing houses make very clear the kinds of materials they are in the market for and will publish. Possibly the works could have been better written had the writer been more relaxed and playful and had not been seeking the approval of editors so desperately.

Writers at ease and at work–in a favorable state for creativity–have many of the attributes of children at play. Psychiatrist D.W. Winnicott wrote that “it is in playing and only playing that the individual child or adult is able to be creative.” Psychoanalyst Erik Erikson said it is striking to see a two-year old child rolling a ball. They can throw the ball on the floor again and again, watching it roll a hundred times and never get little boy in yellow and blue rain jacket playing with a ball in a water puddle or near a water's edgebored. Just as children do that, writers can do something remarkable. As fully absorbed as children, they can work on perfecting a single paragraph forty or fifty times without experiencing a moment of boredom while people who are not writers and think that one draft is sufficient are astonished that such a feat is possible. The conclusion of Amabile’s experiments was that a playful approach like that of children increases the likelihood of producing creative results, and that pursuing external rewards diminishes the person’s creativity.

Being competitive makes it hard for most writers to be relaxed and in a light and child-like playful mood that is conducive to creativity. But competition is a major feature of most writers’ experience Out of necessity writers are forced to be competitive when they try to get their work published. There may be hundreds of other writers attempting to get their work published at the same time in the same magazine or thousands with the same book publisher.

In contrast, the absence of competition and evaluation (other than their own evaluation, perhaps severe, but coming from no one but Woman writing on glass pane in front of her the words, "I'll do it My Way."themselves) which Production Writers experience has been shown to improve the quality of the work that is produced.  That is why so many famous writers think that they, and no one else, are the best judge of their work and why so many of them ignore or don’t ask for the advice of editors. Who enjoys being evaluated? Writers often dread evaluations, and evaluations negatively affect the writer’s mood and thus the quality of work that is produced. A Production Writer may ask for editorial assistance–to be helped–but not to be evaluated.

The best way to recognize which kind of motivation you have is to ask yourself if you’d continue doing the work if no reward were to follow. If you answer, “No way,” your motivation is that of a Publication Writer. But if you answer, “Of course I would; it wouldn’t affect my work whatsoever,” it is the motivation of playful, child-like Production Writers.

 

© 2022 David J. Rogers

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12 Comments

Filed under Boldness, Confidence, Creativity, Motivation, Productivity, Publication Writer or Production Writer, Publishing, Self-Confidence, The Creative Process, Work Production, Writing

12 responses to “Writers with No Desire to Publish

  1. Wow, what a wonderful post. I myself would continue to write despite the lack of outside recognition, but at the same time, I’d also prefer having an audience to write for. I have no idea where that puts me as a writer. Anyway, thanks for this very insightful piece!

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    • Stuart, I’m happy you enjoyed the post. Thank you for the kind feedback.

      I would call you a Production Writer because you would write with or without outside recognition. Another feature of Production Writers that I tried to emphasize in the post is the zeal with which they approach the writer’s task, using all their skills to produce the highest quality work. I think most writers, like you, prefer having an audience. That is why people blog and self-publish.

      I enjoyed writing the post because I thought it was original and gave voice to writers who don’t want to be dependent on being published by magazines, journals, and publishing houses and their all too few publishing opportunities.

      Best of luck with your writing. I hope you continue to enjoy it.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. HeidiAngell

    I started out as a production writer but got caught up in publication and dreams of making a living doing what I love. Hit burnout and walked away, but am trying to get back to the passion of production. It is a process, for sure.

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  3. Good morning David,
    I am very clear that when we work from a great desire to write/paint without the need for reward or recognition – we produce our best work. Given that I have had to undertake a lot of commission work during the now 50 years I have been.a working artist (not so much these days:) I know how that process pulls my reigns in – and definitely has an effect on what I produce. Whereas when I paint/write for the sheer love of it that’s when my work flows….

    I suppose this has been the artist’s dilemma throughout time.

    I set up my life years ago knowing that I would need to take on commissions, teach etc. l. I thought of that work as a means to give me the freedom to occasionally paint what I really wanted to paint.

    The work I have done under the restriction of needing to sell, I have seen as one of the many ways to hone my skills….so that I am always prepared when one of those magic moments of no restrictions presents itself.

    Hope you and Diana are well and that the Chicago weather isn’t too hard.

    Here we continue with rain, a few cold days interspersed with incredibly mild weather. One day at a time:)

    Enjoy the weekend. Janet

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    • Hi Janet.
      Your first paragraph is an accurate and wonderful translation of Amabile’s findings from a seasoned artist’s career. I am always pleased when you tell us readers about your work life. You are such a thought-filled person that you always have carefully-shaped practical insights.

      A need Production Writers and Production Artists must consider is finding a good source of compassionate feedback on the works that are produced–not to evaluate them but to praise them and focus on how the works achieve the effectiveness that they do.
      I like your insight that even when writers and painters are doing less than their favorite type of work, they are learning and honing their skills. Artists and writers are dominated by an urge to improve their skills, and therefore their work.

      Weather here in a word–cold. Your weather sounds up and down, but all in all I would prefer it to ours.
      Best wishes,
      David

      Liked by 1 person

  4. This especially resonated: “If you write, paint, sculpt, dance, etc, to earn rewards other than the enjoyment, satisfaction, and challenge of performing the activity as well as you are able (as Publication Writers do), you are extrinsically motivated and become less creative.” For those who do want to be published, we need to remember to write first and foremost for our own enjoyment.

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    • Cryssa, thank you very much for your comment. You are so right, and I’m hopeful that other writers and artists will take your comment to heart. Looking at your blog, I can see that your love of reading and writing have enabled you to create exciting pieces of historical fiction. Your love and enjoyment of your subject matter is apparent.

      The way in your childhood that reading became a central pat of your existence reminds me of my own childhood. When I was six or seven, I think, my teacher said, “Just read. Read everything. Read cereal boxes, street signs, billboards; just look wherever there are words and read, read, read. I’ve taken that to heart, and that’s what I’ve done ever since. I’m sure you are the same.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Joanne Morrell

    Hi David  How are you? Fantastic post! I run a podcast called The HYBRID Author podcast since May of last year. My audience is mainly Australian based. I’d love to have you on as a guest to talk about your recent post: Writer’s With no Desire to Publish.  Currently episodes are fortnightly, running between 45-60 minutes and are conducted over Zoom. Here’s a link to the mashup I did all of all the guests from last year so you can get a feel for the show: https://open.spotify.com/episode/4cAwiHu6XQccH2CCIQFViy Otherwise my website is:http://www.hybridauthor.com

    and my business email for this is joanne@hybridauthor.com.au  Thanks David. Jo 

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